7/29/2014

Currently

81°F

Clear
Humidity: 39%
Pressure: 30.04 in

Local

Wheelchair competitors hit the court

Wheelchair competitors hit the court
YAKIMA, Wash. -- A group of inspirational students from Seattle and Spokane came to the Yakima Valley on Saturday. All to raise awareness that physical disabilities can't stop them from doing what other kids can.

It's the kind of story where the love for the game conquers all. It’s a life-changing moment that has inspired these group of kids to move forward.

Asuanti Foner, 16, was sent to the hospital for the first time five years ago. He was diagnosed with a spinal cord injury, and it's something he'll never forget.

"I cried and cried and it hurt really bad,” said Asuanti. “It's like being stabbed a thousand times."

He's now part of the track team and manages his school's basketball team. He said his dream to play ball allowed him to find himself.

"My friends didn't want to be around me or they thought I was different," said Asuanti.

For Trevor Denning, a quad accident broke his spinal cord two years ago. He said his parents make a three hour drive every Saturday to take him to basketball practice. Being a part of this team has turned his life around.

"I just kinda accepted the fact that I won't walk again so you just have to make the best of it," said Trevor.

The Seattle Adaptive Sports program has helped students with physical disabilities compete in different sports. More than 40 students participate in their basketball team. Junior High and High school students practice once a week for three hours.

"I just taught myself and just believed in myself that I don't have to be depressed," said Josh Brewer.

Each of student has a different story that changed their circumstances. But the one thing they all have in common was their motivation to overcome their hardships.

"You can't walk around with your head down or if you do, you're not going to go anywhere in life," said Trevor.

With each step they take against the odds, they'll get another chance to score.

The Seattle Adaptive Sports program also offers track, soccer, and sled hockey for students with physical disabilities.
Share:
Some playground equipment hotter than 100 degrees Some playground equipment hotter than 100 degrees