'If it has the potential to kill people, it doesn't belong in this building'

'If it has the potential to kill people, it doesn't belong in this building'
YAKIMA, Wash. -- Two years after a massive security overhaul, dozens of guns still get carried into the Yakima County courthouse each week.

Erika Brooks came to the Yakima County Courthouse to get a marriage license.

"It's just scary knowing that there's that many people walking around with weapons in the community," Brooks said.

Safety is always on her mind, especially in a place like this.

"I don't want to take my kids anywhere that isn't safe or where I don't feel comfortable going," she said.

It's now been two years since a security checkpoint was added to the courthouse.

While each beep, each pat down and each set of eyes has made this place safer, it doesn't mean the danger is gone.

Despite the metal detectors, security workers still find an average of four guns a day here as well as a daily dose of knives and pepper spray. The people carrying those weapons are required to store them in a nearby locker, but not everyone does so willfully.

Surprisingly, most of the people who are vocal about being stopped with a weapon aren't gang members or your neighborhood thug, but senior citizens and veterans. Security workers say it's those types of people who feel they've already given back to society so they view this security as a hassle.

Many of those folks have simply forgotten that they're carrying a weapon. But, in a building that's filled with people down on their luck, security officers treat everyone as a potential threat.

"We never had security before this, We're lucky nothing ever happened," said Sgt. Nolan Johnson.

More than 2,000 weapons have been found in the last year alone. For now, security workers can't say it enough: if it has the potential to kill people, it doesn't belong in this building.