Police dash cam video shows more details from officer involved shooting

Police dash cam video shows more details from officer involved shooting
YAKIMA, Wash. -- KIMA has obtained the video and sound recordings of the moments just after a Yakima officer shot and killed a man earlier this year. Action News has also learned more about what police are saying happened in those early morning hours.

We obtained the Yakima Police Department's report that investigated the shooting as well as video and the calls from the officer's patrol car. It includes Officer Casey Gillette's own account and some confusion about when he pulled his gun.

"Three shots fired.
Location?
Unit one calling, shots fired.
Location?
Unit 3 shots fired, suspect is down, shots fired suspect down."

That's Officer Casey Gillette's call to dispatch immediately after he shot and killed Rocendo Arias.

"All available units, 909 East Nob Hill," from radio dispatch.

KIMA obtained the recording and police dash cam video after filing a public records request with the city of Yakima. You can see one of the first backup officers arrive at the car wash. Dozens show up. They surround the car with guns drawn.

But, you only see the aftermath. Police say there is no video showing how Officer Gillette approached the parked car with Arias inside.
These images from Gillette's patrol car show he's out of position to record the fatal confrontation.

In YPD's incident report, Gillette told investigators he parked that way because he didn't plan to make an arrest or expect any trouble.
He had gone to the car wash after seeing the car parked there for at least an hour and thought it looked suspicious.

A closer look at the report shows Gillette backtracked on whether he pulled his gun before he opened Arias' passenger door, or after.
He first told investigators, "I know I had my gun out because I didn't have to draw it, I mean, It was already right there on him."
He then gave a different response when asked which hand he used to open the car door, "I don't believe I had my gun out at that point. There would have been no reason to."

The report notes it's common that officers don't remember drawing their guns in these situations because of the repetition of training.

The report also shows Gillette wasn't the first to notice Arias' car.
A state trooper spotted it while she was washing her patrol car.
She says she checked out the scene and assumed the driver was just taking a nap.

A different approach from Officer Gillette, with a very different outcome.

The Yakima County Prosecutor ruled the shooting was justified based on the perceived threat. Prosecutor Jim Hagarty did not respond to our requests for comment today. The attorney for the Rocendo Arias family says the lawsuit against the city of Yakima and YPD for wrongful death is still in process.